Picking cotton free download

August 25, 2021 / Rating: 4.5 / Views: 930

Related Images "Picking cotton free download" (15 pics):

2 chainz discography free download

2 Chainz is the stage name of Atlanta rapper Tauheed Epps, once known as Tity Boi in the Atlanta-based Playaz Circle. With three platinum hits -- "No Lie" featuring Drake, "Birthday Song" featuring Kanye West, and "I'm Different" -- the album hit number one on the Billboard 200, and easily reached platinum status. The album featured the hits "Feds Watching" and "Where U Been." 2 Chainz was also heard on singles from B.o. Epps launched a successful solo career in 2010 and began issuing a parade of Top 40 hits while becoming a go-to artist for guest verses. 2 Chainz continued to dominate the charts throughout the next decade, consistently hitting the top ten with albums like 2017's Pretty Girls Like Trap Music and material from his 2020 record So Help Me God. B ("Headband"), Major Lazer ("Bubble Butt"), and Juicy J ("Bandz a Make Her Dance") that year. His breakout year was 2012, when he landed on Kanye West's "Mercy" and Nicki Minaj's "Beez in the Trap" before dropping his official debut, Based on a T. Born and raised in College Park, Georgia, he first went solo in 2007 with the mixtape Me Against the World. The album featured three hits ("No Lie" featuring Drake, "Birthday Song" featuring Kanye West, and "I'm Different") and hit number one on the album charts, reaching platinum status. In 2016, after additional featured appearances, he released "Feel Like Cappin'" along with the album Colle Grove, a collaboration with Lil Wayne, although only 2 Chainz was credited due to label issues. The 2Pac references continued with his 2009 mixtapes Trap-A-Velli and All Ice on Me, but 2010's Me Against the World 2: Codeine Withdrawal hit his style on the nose with the last bit of its title, and when DJ Teknikz and DJ Frank White collected his best street tracks in 2011, the hard and hazy set of cuts was dubbed the Codeine Cowboy mixtape. T.'s "Money on the Floor." The year 2012 was major for 2 Chainz. Other guests included Lil Wayne, Nicki Minaj, and Mike Posner, while production was handled by the likes of the-Dream and Drumma Boy. By the end of the busy year, he had dropped a handful of additional mixtapes and debuted the Drake-assisted single "Big Amount." Led by the hit "Good Drank," featuring Quavo and Gucci Mane, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music, his fourth proper album for Def Jam, arrived in 2017. That same year he was featured on David Banner's "Yao Ming" and Big K. He was featured on Kanye West's "Mercy" and Nicki Minaj's "Beez in the Trap," then released his official debut, Based on a T. Following later announcements that 2 Chainz had been working on new material with Pharrell Williams and Drake, a sequel, B. The album peaked at number two on the Billboard 200 and topped the R&B and Hip-Hop charts. 2 Chainz followed with appearances on tracks by Steve Aoki ("Without U"), Jeezy ("Floor Seats"), Eminem ("Chloraseptic [Remix]"), and Migos ("Too Playa"). In early 2018, he issued his fourth EP, The Play Don't Care Who Makes It (Def Jam), featuring appearances by YG and Offset. The EP proved to be a sleeper, entering the Billboard charts two years later. Early 2019 saw 2 Chainz team up with Ariana Grande for the single "Rule the World", which appeared on the full-length Rap or Go to the League, which arrived later that March. The mixtape included both individual performances and collaborations between 2 Chainz and the core artists on the label. In 2020, 2 Chainz presented No Face No Case, a showcase for his label/collective T. Before 2020 was up, he released his sixth studio album So Help Me God, preceded by lead single "Money Maker" in August of 2020 -- its projected September release date was delayed by sample clearance issues. Glancing at the featuring artists, we’re guessing that it was these heavyweights’ busy schedules that caused the release to be delayed. So Help Me God was ultimately released in November of 2020 and featured a plethora of big-name guest stars who included Lil Wayne, Kevin Gates, Kanye West, Rick Ross, Lil Uzi Vert, and many others. One thing is for sure: 2 Chainz’ sixth album was worth the wait. Despite the slightly confusing opening few tracks, its versatile and audacious side enrich the current American rap scene – one which all too often relies on autopilot. That does mean that there are a few flops, like Lambo Wrist and Quarantine Thick (despite being one of the album’s singles). Though the risk-taking also gives us soaring, graceful, brilliant moments. Like Can’t Go For That which, as the title suggests, samples from Hall and Oates’ 1981 hit, embellishing it with TR-808 rhythms. It’s a track where the melody is brought to the fore, something which happens again on Southside Hov and Vampire. Though 2 Chainz would be nothing without his dark side. Even though the melodies are largely optimistic, some tracks like Ziploc featuring Kevin Gates will appeal to those who like deep, mellow moods. 2 Chainz sure knows how to throw a party: Kanye West and the Rn B sensation Brent Faiyaz get involved on Feel A Way, a track that’s overflowing with creativity and was co-produced by the great Mike Dean. The latter was also behind YRB, a flavourful synth-packed guitar-soaked track featuring Rick Ross and Skooly. Coming after his No Face No Case project released earlier in 2020, 2 Chainz proves that even though his releases sound like a succession of tracks with no overall message or atmosphere, he’s still a banger rap boss. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz Tauheed Epps' secondary releases throughout 2016 indicated that the rapper was heading toward something special for proper solo album three. Released four months after he became the Grammy-winning 2 Chainz -- Chance the Rapper's "No Problem," featuring him and Lil Wayne, took the award for Best Rap Performance -- this full-length is presented in an offhanded manner that contradicts its magnitude. Pretty Girls Like Trap Music sounds like the title of a tape rather than that of a career high from a rapper who, despite his categorical affiliation and outsize personality, is no mere entertainer. Likewise, the packaging of the compact disc edition is bare, supplying no information beyond the track list and credits for artwork, A&R, and executive production. Inconspicuousness notwithstanding, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music is among Epps' most significant and enjoyable work. His raised-voice/grimaced-face mode is more commanding than ever, and whether drawn from the past or present, the word play -- from "Used to treat my mattress like the ATM" to "I bought a Tesla today/There's nothin' left in your tank" -- is consistently vivid. In "Realize," featuring Nicki Minaj, he breaks from glowering to nearly losing his composure as he snaps at the government and his younger mumbling contemporaries. As Epps and his collaborators demonstrate the life left in trap music, a form that sounds either bankrupt or uprooted in the hands of many, the album also flashes back. "Trap Check," a highlight, is a laser-focused, easy-rolling track that binds Jeezy's "Get Ya Mind Right" to T. I.'s "ASAP" -- classics that predate even "Duffle Bag Boy," Epps' biggest Playaz Circle hit, and still sound fresh. The album ends with one of rap's most moving poverty-to-prosperity numbers, an elegant Mike Dean production with a reverential introduction from Minister Louis Farrakhan and an ascending hook from Monica. There's more weight to "See my mom was a addict, and my dad was the dealer, and they son is that n*gga" than the average commercial rapper's most profound thought. © Andy Kellman /Ti Vo If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot. © David Jeffries /Ti Vo If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot. © David Jeffries /Ti Vo Eight months after he released his fourth consecutive Top Five album, 2 Chainz returned with a commercial EP sporting a title worthy of an album. The Play Don't Care Who Makes It contains four tracks, acting as an extension of the previous year's Pretty Girls Like Trap Music and similar to the earlier EPs in its lack of second-rate material. Few match the rapper when it comes to nimbly switching between humble reflections and hubristic nonsense. © Ti Vo The title of Atlanta rapper 2 Chainz's fifth studio album, Rap or Go to the League, is a reference to the destructive belief that the only two routes out of a life of crime and poverty are to either become a famous rapper or athlete. The title alone indicates a new level of consciousness and amplified maturity, at least moving well past the larger-than-life party monster persona that made some of his early songs multi-platinum hits. While there are still moments of that strip-club bravado here, these 14 songs are more reflective and thoughtful than anything 2 Chainz has turned in before. Beats built on wistful soul samples make up tracks like the Ariana Grande-assisted "Rule the World" or the autobiographical album opener, "Forgiven," creating a pervasive mood of introspection. Rap or Go to the League moves between this emotional searching and bangers like "Momma I Hit a Lick" and bass-heavy flex-fests like "2 Dollar Bill." 2 Chainz calls out the big guns on these tracks, with verses from Lil Wayne, E-40, and Kendrick Lamar, and elsewhere on the album he trades rhymes with Travis Scott, Kodak Black, Chance the Rapper, Young Thug, and Ty Dolla $ign. The strength of the album is its ability to explore more serious themes without losing the fun and swagger that the rapper made his name on. Now in his early forties, it makes sense that 2 Chainz's art is developing beyond hedonistic abandon to touch on real-life concerns like family, society, and becoming an elder statesman of the rap game. Without making any kind of heavy-handed declaration, Rap or Go to the League is a step forward in 2 Chainz's artistry, and reveals sides of his personality that were previously harder to see in the shadow of his enormous persona. © Fred Thomas /Ti Vo Tauheed Epps' secondary releases throughout 2016 indicated that the rapper was heading toward something special for proper solo album three. Released four months after he became the Grammy-winning 2 Chainz -- Chance the Rapper's "No Problem," featuring him and Lil Wayne, took the award for Best Rap Performance -- this full-length is presented in an offhanded manner that contradicts its magnitude. Pretty Girls Like Trap Music sounds like the title of a tape rather than that of a career high from a rapper who, despite his categorical affiliation and outsize personality, is no mere entertainer. Likewise, the packaging of the compact disc edition is bare, supplying no information beyond the track list and credits for artwork, A&R, and executive production. Inconspicuousness notwithstanding, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music is among Epps' most significant and enjoyable work. His raised-voice/grimaced-face mode is more commanding than ever, and whether drawn from the past or present, the word play -- from "Used to treat my mattress like the ATM" to "I bought a Tesla today/There's nothin' left in your tank" -- is consistently vivid. In "Realize," featuring Nicki Minaj, he breaks from glowering to nearly losing his composure as he snaps at the government and his younger mumbling contemporaries. As Epps and his collaborators demonstrate the life left in trap music, a form that sounds either bankrupt or uprooted in the hands of many, the album also flashes back. Story," a reference to the rapper's debut album, but "best of all time" isn't a bad guess after all because 2 Chainz's sophomore release is one serious step up. "Trap Check," a highlight, is a laser-focused, easy-rolling track that binds Jeezy's "Get Ya Mind Right" to T. T.-style because those initials on the cover stand for "Based on a T. That's "serious" as in "significant" since the "METIME" on the cover references to 2 Chainz desire that this album feel like a vacation, and with the greatest hook here being a duet with Fergie that goes "Let's make a sex tape and put it on Netflix," the concept of vacation-on-wax (or mp3) is at the very center of the rapper's comfort zone. I.'s "ASAP" -- classics that predate even "Duffle Bag Boy," Epps' biggest Playaz Circle hit, and still sound fresh. Even so, the album is full of surprises, starting with Fergie's undeniably awesome stoner reference (even the snobbiest weed head should respect "You smoke that Bobby Brown, we on that Shabba Ranks"), and spanning all the way to the rebirth of rapper Mase, who drops a poignant look back at his troubled career during the somewhat sane stunner "Beautiful Pain" ("Call me a hypocrite, backstabber, you name it I done heard it/The way they speak of me you think I'm already murdered"). The album ends with one of rap's most moving poverty-to-prosperity numbers, an elegant Mike Dean production with a reverential introduction from Minister Louis Farrakhan and an ascending hook from Monica. Like Jay-Z's "99 Problems," "Feds Watching" is a great number inspired by a police traffic stop ("I pray to the lord and ask for forgiveness/If he popped my trunk I can get a life sentence") but this time with Pharrell on the funky production and soulful hook, then there's the Mannie Fresh production "Black Unicorn," which features grand, elegant strings, and the last thing you'd expect on a 2 Chainz album: beat poetry. There's more weight to "See my mom was a addict, and my dad was the dealer, and they son is that n*gga" than the average commercial rapper's most profound thought. Still, these ambitious moments are just icing on the cake since the base of the album is the solid, silly, and trend-setting club tracks that fans expect, all of them delivered effortlessly and overflowing with simple street wit. II adds some Bootsy Collins charisma and ambitious ringleader style to his discography. Glancing at the featuring artists, we’re guessing that it was these heavyweights’ busy schedules that caused the release to be delayed. Highlight "36" rumbles the trunk and makes a hook out herb measurements ("36, that's how many ounces in a briiiiiiiiiiick") while "Where U Been? Pick the sequel over the original and get ready for some stinky, dank, and fun me time. One thing is for sure: 2 Chainz’ sixth album was worth the wait. " is heartbreak 2 Chainz and Mike Will Made-It style with betrayal lyrics going ghetto ("Bought a new crib just to f*ck you in") over hypnotic, pounding production. Despite the slightly confusing opening few tracks, its versatile and audacious side enrich the current American rap scene – one which all too often relies on autopilot. That does mean that there are a few flops, like Lambo Wrist and Quarantine Thick (despite being one of the album’s singles). 2 Chainz is still a punch-line rapper at heart, but B. Though the risk-taking also gives us soaring, graceful, brilliant moments. Like Can’t Go For That which, as the title suggests, samples from Hall and Oates’ 1981 hit, embellishing it with TR-808 rhythms. It’s a track where the melody is brought to the fore, something which happens again on Southside Hov and Vampire. Though 2 Chainz would be nothing without his dark side. Even though the melodies are largely optimistic, some tracks like Ziploc featuring Kevin Gates will appeal to those who like deep, mellow moods. 2 Chainz sure knows how to throw a party: Kanye West and the Rn B sensation Brent Faiyaz get involved on Feel A Way, a track that’s overflowing with creativity and was co-produced by the great Mike Dean. The latter was also behind YRB, a flavourful synth-packed guitar-soaked track featuring Rick Ross and Skooly. Coming after his No Face No Case project released earlier in 2020, 2 Chainz proves that even though his releases sound like a succession of tracks with no overall message or atmosphere, he’s still a banger rap boss. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot. 2 Chainz is the stage name of Atlanta rapper Tauheed Epps, once known as Tity Boi in the Atlanta-based Playaz Circle. With three platinum hits -- "No Lie" featuring Drake, "Birthday Song" featuring Kanye West, and "I'm Different" -- the album hit number one on the Billboard 200, and easily reached platinum status. The album featured the hits "Feds Watching" and "Where U Been." 2 Chainz was also heard on singles from B.o. Epps launched a successful solo career in 2010 and began issuing a parade of Top 40 hits while becoming a go-to artist for guest verses. 2 Chainz continued to dominate the charts throughout the next decade, consistently hitting the top ten with albums like 2017's Pretty Girls Like Trap Music and material from his 2020 record So Help Me God. B ("Headband"), Major Lazer ("Bubble Butt"), and Juicy J ("Bandz a Make Her Dance") that year. His breakout year was 2012, when he landed on Kanye West's "Mercy" and Nicki Minaj's "Beez in the Trap" before dropping his official debut, Based on a T. Born and raised in College Park, Georgia, he first went solo in 2007 with the mixtape Me Against the World. The album featured three hits ("No Lie" featuring Drake, "Birthday Song" featuring Kanye West, and "I'm Different") and hit number one on the album charts, reaching platinum status. In 2016, after additional featured appearances, he released "Feel Like Cappin'" along with the album Colle Grove, a collaboration with Lil Wayne, although only 2 Chainz was credited due to label issues. The 2Pac references continued with his 2009 mixtapes Trap-A-Velli and All Ice on Me, but 2010's Me Against the World 2: Codeine Withdrawal hit his style on the nose with the last bit of its title, and when DJ Teknikz and DJ Frank White collected his best street tracks in 2011, the hard and hazy set of cuts was dubbed the Codeine Cowboy mixtape. T.'s "Money on the Floor." The year 2012 was major for 2 Chainz. Other guests included Lil Wayne, Nicki Minaj, and Mike Posner, while production was handled by the likes of the-Dream and Drumma Boy. By the end of the busy year, he had dropped a handful of additional mixtapes and debuted the Drake-assisted single "Big Amount." Led by the hit "Good Drank," featuring Quavo and Gucci Mane, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music, his fourth proper album for Def Jam, arrived in 2017. That same year he was featured on David Banner's "Yao Ming" and Big K. He was featured on Kanye West's "Mercy" and Nicki Minaj's "Beez in the Trap," then released his official debut, Based on a T. Following later announcements that 2 Chainz had been working on new material with Pharrell Williams and Drake, a sequel, B. The album peaked at number two on the Billboard 200 and topped the R&B and Hip-Hop charts. 2 Chainz followed with appearances on tracks by Steve Aoki ("Without U"), Jeezy ("Floor Seats"), Eminem ("Chloraseptic [Remix]"), and Migos ("Too Playa"). In early 2018, he issued his fourth EP, The Play Don't Care Who Makes It (Def Jam), featuring appearances by YG and Offset. The EP proved to be a sleeper, entering the Billboard charts two years later. Early 2019 saw 2 Chainz team up with Ariana Grande for the single "Rule the World", which appeared on the full-length Rap or Go to the League, which arrived later that March. The mixtape included both individual performances and collaborations between 2 Chainz and the core artists on the label. In 2020, 2 Chainz presented No Face No Case, a showcase for his label/collective T. Before 2020 was up, he released his sixth studio album So Help Me God, preceded by lead single "Money Maker" in August of 2020 -- its projected September release date was delayed by sample clearance issues. Glancing at the featuring artists, we’re guessing that it was these heavyweights’ busy schedules that caused the release to be delayed. So Help Me God was ultimately released in November of 2020 and featured a plethora of big-name guest stars who included Lil Wayne, Kevin Gates, Kanye West, Rick Ross, Lil Uzi Vert, and many others. One thing is for sure: 2 Chainz’ sixth album was worth the wait. Despite the slightly confusing opening few tracks, its versatile and audacious side enrich the current American rap scene – one which all too often relies on autopilot. That does mean that there are a few flops, like Lambo Wrist and Quarantine Thick (despite being one of the album’s singles). Though the risk-taking also gives us soaring, graceful, brilliant moments. Like Can’t Go For That which, as the title suggests, samples from Hall and Oates’ 1981 hit, embellishing it with TR-808 rhythms. It’s a track where the melody is brought to the fore, something which happens again on Southside Hov and Vampire. Though 2 Chainz would be nothing without his dark side. Even though the melodies are largely optimistic, some tracks like Ziploc featuring Kevin Gates will appeal to those who like deep, mellow moods. 2 Chainz sure knows how to throw a party: Kanye West and the Rn B sensation Brent Faiyaz get involved on Feel A Way, a track that’s overflowing with creativity and was co-produced by the great Mike Dean. The latter was also behind YRB, a flavourful synth-packed guitar-soaked track featuring Rick Ross and Skooly. Coming after his No Face No Case project released earlier in 2020, 2 Chainz proves that even though his releases sound like a succession of tracks with no overall message or atmosphere, he’s still a banger rap boss. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz Tauheed Epps' secondary releases throughout 2016 indicated that the rapper was heading toward something special for proper solo album three. Released four months after he became the Grammy-winning 2 Chainz -- Chance the Rapper's "No Problem," featuring him and Lil Wayne, took the award for Best Rap Performance -- this full-length is presented in an offhanded manner that contradicts its magnitude. Pretty Girls Like Trap Music sounds like the title of a tape rather than that of a career high from a rapper who, despite his categorical affiliation and outsize personality, is no mere entertainer. Likewise, the packaging of the compact disc edition is bare, supplying no information beyond the track list and credits for artwork, A&R, and executive production. Inconspicuousness notwithstanding, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music is among Epps' most significant and enjoyable work. His raised-voice/grimaced-face mode is more commanding than ever, and whether drawn from the past or present, the word play -- from "Used to treat my mattress like the ATM" to "I bought a Tesla today/There's nothin' left in your tank" -- is consistently vivid. In "Realize," featuring Nicki Minaj, he breaks from glowering to nearly losing his composure as he snaps at the government and his younger mumbling contemporaries. As Epps and his collaborators demonstrate the life left in trap music, a form that sounds either bankrupt or uprooted in the hands of many, the album also flashes back. "Trap Check," a highlight, is a laser-focused, easy-rolling track that binds Jeezy's "Get Ya Mind Right" to T. I.'s "ASAP" -- classics that predate even "Duffle Bag Boy," Epps' biggest Playaz Circle hit, and still sound fresh. The album ends with one of rap's most moving poverty-to-prosperity numbers, an elegant Mike Dean production with a reverential introduction from Minister Louis Farrakhan and an ascending hook from Monica. There's more weight to "See my mom was a addict, and my dad was the dealer, and they son is that n*gga" than the average commercial rapper's most profound thought. © Andy Kellman /Ti Vo If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot. © David Jeffries /Ti Vo If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot. © David Jeffries /Ti Vo Eight months after he released his fourth consecutive Top Five album, 2 Chainz returned with a commercial EP sporting a title worthy of an album. The Play Don't Care Who Makes It contains four tracks, acting as an extension of the previous year's Pretty Girls Like Trap Music and similar to the earlier EPs in its lack of second-rate material. Few match the rapper when it comes to nimbly switching between humble reflections and hubristic nonsense. © Ti Vo The title of Atlanta rapper 2 Chainz's fifth studio album, Rap or Go to the League, is a reference to the destructive belief that the only two routes out of a life of crime and poverty are to either become a famous rapper or athlete. The title alone indicates a new level of consciousness and amplified maturity, at least moving well past the larger-than-life party monster persona that made some of his early songs multi-platinum hits. While there are still moments of that strip-club bravado here, these 14 songs are more reflective and thoughtful than anything 2 Chainz has turned in before. Beats built on wistful soul samples make up tracks like the Ariana Grande-assisted "Rule the World" or the autobiographical album opener, "Forgiven," creating a pervasive mood of introspection. Rap or Go to the League moves between this emotional searching and bangers like "Momma I Hit a Lick" and bass-heavy flex-fests like "2 Dollar Bill." 2 Chainz calls out the big guns on these tracks, with verses from Lil Wayne, E-40, and Kendrick Lamar, and elsewhere on the album he trades rhymes with Travis Scott, Kodak Black, Chance the Rapper, Young Thug, and Ty Dolla $ign. The strength of the album is its ability to explore more serious themes without losing the fun and swagger that the rapper made his name on. Now in his early forties, it makes sense that 2 Chainz's art is developing beyond hedonistic abandon to touch on real-life concerns like family, society, and becoming an elder statesman of the rap game. Without making any kind of heavy-handed declaration, Rap or Go to the League is a step forward in 2 Chainz's artistry, and reveals sides of his personality that were previously harder to see in the shadow of his enormous persona. © Fred Thomas /Ti Vo Tauheed Epps' secondary releases throughout 2016 indicated that the rapper was heading toward something special for proper solo album three. Released four months after he became the Grammy-winning 2 Chainz -- Chance the Rapper's "No Problem," featuring him and Lil Wayne, took the award for Best Rap Performance -- this full-length is presented in an offhanded manner that contradicts its magnitude. Pretty Girls Like Trap Music sounds like the title of a tape rather than that of a career high from a rapper who, despite his categorical affiliation and outsize personality, is no mere entertainer. Likewise, the packaging of the compact disc edition is bare, supplying no information beyond the track list and credits for artwork, A&R, and executive production. Inconspicuousness notwithstanding, Pretty Girls Like Trap Music is among Epps' most significant and enjoyable work. His raised-voice/grimaced-face mode is more commanding than ever, and whether drawn from the past or present, the word play -- from "Used to treat my mattress like the ATM" to "I bought a Tesla today/There's nothin' left in your tank" -- is consistently vivid. In "Realize," featuring Nicki Minaj, he breaks from glowering to nearly losing his composure as he snaps at the government and his younger mumbling contemporaries. As Epps and his collaborators demonstrate the life left in trap music, a form that sounds either bankrupt or uprooted in the hands of many, the album also flashes back. Story," a reference to the rapper's debut album, but "best of all time" isn't a bad guess after all because 2 Chainz's sophomore release is one serious step up. "Trap Check," a highlight, is a laser-focused, easy-rolling track that binds Jeezy's "Get Ya Mind Right" to T. T.-style because those initials on the cover stand for "Based on a T. That's "serious" as in "significant" since the "METIME" on the cover references to 2 Chainz desire that this album feel like a vacation, and with the greatest hook here being a duet with Fergie that goes "Let's make a sex tape and put it on Netflix," the concept of vacation-on-wax (or mp3) is at the very center of the rapper's comfort zone. I.'s "ASAP" -- classics that predate even "Duffle Bag Boy," Epps' biggest Playaz Circle hit, and still sound fresh. Even so, the album is full of surprises, starting with Fergie's undeniably awesome stoner reference (even the snobbiest weed head should respect "You smoke that Bobby Brown, we on that Shabba Ranks"), and spanning all the way to the rebirth of rapper Mase, who drops a poignant look back at his troubled career during the somewhat sane stunner "Beautiful Pain" ("Call me a hypocrite, backstabber, you name it I done heard it/The way they speak of me you think I'm already murdered"). The album ends with one of rap's most moving poverty-to-prosperity numbers, an elegant Mike Dean production with a reverential introduction from Minister Louis Farrakhan and an ascending hook from Monica. Like Jay-Z's "99 Problems," "Feds Watching" is a great number inspired by a police traffic stop ("I pray to the lord and ask for forgiveness/If he popped my trunk I can get a life sentence") but this time with Pharrell on the funky production and soulful hook, then there's the Mannie Fresh production "Black Unicorn," which features grand, elegant strings, and the last thing you'd expect on a 2 Chainz album: beat poetry. There's more weight to "See my mom was a addict, and my dad was the dealer, and they son is that n*gga" than the average commercial rapper's most profound thought. Still, these ambitious moments are just icing on the cake since the base of the album is the solid, silly, and trend-setting club tracks that fans expect, all of them delivered effortlessly and overflowing with simple street wit. II adds some Bootsy Collins charisma and ambitious ringleader style to his discography. Glancing at the featuring artists, we’re guessing that it was these heavyweights’ busy schedules that caused the release to be delayed. Highlight "36" rumbles the trunk and makes a hook out herb measurements ("36, that's how many ounces in a briiiiiiiiiiick") while "Where U Been? Pick the sequel over the original and get ready for some stinky, dank, and fun me time. One thing is for sure: 2 Chainz’ sixth album was worth the wait. " is heartbreak 2 Chainz and Mike Will Made-It style with betrayal lyrics going ghetto ("Bought a new crib just to f*ck you in") over hypnotic, pounding production. Despite the slightly confusing opening few tracks, its versatile and audacious side enrich the current American rap scene – one which all too often relies on autopilot. That does mean that there are a few flops, like Lambo Wrist and Quarantine Thick (despite being one of the album’s singles). 2 Chainz is still a punch-line rapper at heart, but B. Though the risk-taking also gives us soaring, graceful, brilliant moments. Like Can’t Go For That which, as the title suggests, samples from Hall and Oates’ 1981 hit, embellishing it with TR-808 rhythms. It’s a track where the melody is brought to the fore, something which happens again on Southside Hov and Vampire. Though 2 Chainz would be nothing without his dark side. Even though the melodies are largely optimistic, some tracks like Ziploc featuring Kevin Gates will appeal to those who like deep, mellow moods. 2 Chainz sure knows how to throw a party: Kanye West and the Rn B sensation Brent Faiyaz get involved on Feel A Way, a track that’s overflowing with creativity and was co-produced by the great Mike Dean. The latter was also behind YRB, a flavourful synth-packed guitar-soaked track featuring Rick Ross and Skooly. Coming after his No Face No Case project released earlier in 2020, 2 Chainz proves that even though his releases sound like a succession of tracks with no overall message or atmosphere, he’s still a banger rap boss. © Brice Miclet/Qobuz If there's a reason to cheer for 2 Chainz, it's that the limited but now loveable rapper lifted himself out of a dead-end group (the Sporty Thievz-like Playaz Circle), dropped his awful name (who wants to say they're the world's biggest Tity Boy fan? Story is a fine payoff, coming off as trendy as those jeans Chainz keeps repping, but still quirky enough to stick to the ribs. ," a high-powered Streetrunner production with Lil Wayne getting in the distasteful spirit of the album (warning: he's searching through his black book for a girlfriend who's not experiencing "the monthlies") while Chainz places his second favorite product when Similac gets another mention, once again thanks to the rapper's skill at baby making. ), and reinvented himself as a welcome character somewhere between the syrup-sipping Pluto and the slang-slinging Pootie Tang, all while rocking True Religion everything (and if the clothing company didn't pay for all this album's product placement, they should send Chainz a box of swag immediately). "Birthday Song" borrows Wayne's love of dumb bluntness for the great "She got a big booty, so I call her 'Big Booty'," while "Extremely Blessed" offers both "Our first date was the Waffle House" and "If you a chicken head, go and lay some eggs" which producer The-Dream coats in polished R&B for a track that's quite velvety and Ludacris. This devil-may-care style that's right in line with the flash-flavoring landscape of 2012, was refined over mixtapes, street releases, and guest spots, all of it smart preparation for this official debut. In this environment, a stripper track with Nicki Minaj can't go wrong, and when hooky singles "No Lie" with Drake and "Birthday Song" with Kanye West find their respective superstars coming down to Chainz' big booty level, it's like free drinks and table dances all night long. Still, there are a couple unexpected highlights, like Mike Posner getting convincingly nasty on "In Town," or "Stop Me Now," which plays it soulful, smooth, and nostalgic ("All my Planets were Digable"). The claim "Every line is so dope, you can snort it" is an oversell, but 2 Chainz over-promises and almost delivers on his official debut, putting him right in the punch-line rapper's sweet spot.

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:01next


2020-2021 © a.obbosoft.com
Sitemap